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NEW YORK iO\\\6 
COMPANY 

WARRtN.OHIO. LbA. 



PACK 



AMPS 













q/9 



N,'.>. Y & Ohio Com: 



|>ACK\KI) 

LAM1 



} U. S. A. 



copyrighted 1899 
New York 4. Ohio Company 



I BY 

MPANY 



New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 



The PACKARD INCANDESCENT UMP has been on the 
market since 1889, we having been one of the first independent 
companies to engage in the manufacture of lamps. Our factory 
has been continuously under one management and a constant 
improvement has been effected in our product. Our factory 
equipment is unsurpassed by any and having lately largely in- 
creased our facilities, we are now better prepared than ever before 
to supply any requirements in our line promptly and with an article 
which we unhesitatingly claim to be superior, for general use, to 
any lamp ever before made. It has always been our policy to 
turn out the best, regardless of cost and we have spared no pains 
or expense in obtaining the most advanced processes and equip- 
ment to carry on the manufacture of incandescent lamps. 

A chemical process of exhausting lamps has been employed 
by ns since 1892. This process is unique and distinct from any 
other used and is of the greatest value to the quality of our 
product. The vacuum obtained is one of perfect insulating 
qualities and it is to this process that the unique behavior of our 
lamps, in absolutely maintaining their candle-power and efficiency, 
is largely due. In our present product the "curve of candle- 
power " is very nearly a straight line, showing a very slight rise 
in the first fifty hours of burning, only. The importance of this 
feature cannot be overestimated and the value of a lamp which will 
hold to its full candle-power throughout its useful life, is much greater 
than that of the ordinary lamp which necessarily ■, continually falls 
off from the start. This maintenance of candle-power in our lamp 
is not obtained at the expense of efficiency, as the total watts 
consumed at no time exceeds its initial value. Since we adopted 
our improved process of pumping in 1892, every lamp during its 
evacuation and treatment has received individual attention, it 
never having been our practice to treat lamps in lots of 100 or 
more as has been universally done by other makers. 

In appearance and workmanship our lamps are unsur= 
passed. We use the finest moulded bulbs and of one make only, 
that of the Corning Glass Works, whose product is noted for its 
brilliancy and clearness. We use no second hand material, such 
as cleaned up bases, nor do we repair lamps or carry any stock of 
these on hand. 



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New York & Ohio Company, Warren. Ohio 



newals adds but little to the cost of operation, while it may 
increase the lighting efficiency 40 or 50 per cent. 

The illuminating power of a lamp is denned in candle- 
power. The candle-power varies somewhat in different directions, 
but for practical purposes is generally taken in a horizontal direc- 
tion when the lamp is suspended vertically with the filaments so 
placed as to be all visible from the point of view at which it is 
regarded. Each of our lamps is measured while revolving, so 
that the actual average illumination is obtained and when at its 
proper candle-power, the watts consumed by each lamp are meas- 
ured, as well as the volts or K. M. F. required to bring it to that 
candle-power. A perfect evenness of product, both as to illumi- 
nating power and as to current consumed, is thus assured. 

The power taken by a lamp is measured in watts and a watt 
is defined as the power conveyed by a current of one ampere, 
flowing through a circuit under a pressure or electro-motive-force 
(E. M. F. I of one volt. The wattage of a lamp is the number 
of watts required to bring it to its marked candle-power. The 
efficiency of a lamp is usually expressed in watts per candle- 
power and is the quotient obtained by dividing the total watts 
taken by the lamp ( which is the product of the volts multiplied 
by the amperes) by the candle-power. If we wish to determine 
the number of lamps which can be operated per electrical horse- 
power, we divide 746 by the number denoting the total watts 
taken by the lamp. The quotient gives the number of lamps 
per electrical horse power. 746 watts are the equivalent of one 
electrical horse-power. 

As electricity is generally sold by kilo- watt-hours, representing 
an expenditure of an energy of 1000 watts for one hour of time, 
we may wish to determine the number of hours in which any 
lamp will use one kilo- watt, or unit, of electricity, or the number of 
lamps which could be operated for one hour by one kilo-watt: 
In this case, we divide 1000 by the total power in watts taken by 
the lamp and the quotient obtained is the desired answer. 

The currents, in amperes, taken by lamps of various candle- 
power, voltages and efficiencies are shown in the tables on page 8. 






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New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 






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New Y'jhk i O- 



Standard Styles of Bases. 




1 Porcelain in tuLation. 




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Brush Swan. M-ith^r PlB 

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New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 






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Fl* 2. 




C P. 


A 


B 


4 and 6 


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s and 10 


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7" 


Window 

Cand< Labra 


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Tubular 


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12 



New York d. 0mo Company. Warren, Ohio 



Six Candle-power 50 Volt Lamp. 



( Standard Edison Base. J 




Fig. 3— Full Size 



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Thirty two 










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Sixteen Candle-power 1 10 Volt, One-half Frosted Lamp. 

(Sundi/d I 







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New York d. Ohio Company. Warren. Ohio 



Sixteen Candle-power 110 Volt, One-half Frosted Lamp. 

(Ail Porcelain, Thomson-Houston Base*) 




Fig. is ft! 9b* 

)• •,.-,.•• •• ;,« ; • •); ■ r.n« if of th< Lamp from tm Lip Lo tin baM 
it a very neat and efl« i 



New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 



Sixteen Candle-power J 10 Volt Window Lamp. 



(Edison Base.) 




Fig. 16— Full Size, 



The above cut shows our round bulb or so-called window lamp, used largely 
for decorative purposes and in special shades, furnished in eight, ten and 
sixteen candle-powers. Range of voltage from 45 to 60 and 90 to 130 volts 



. 




New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 



Two and Three Candle-power 12 Volt Lamp, 



SIGN LAMP. 



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(Edison Candelabra Base.) 




Fig. 18— Full Size. 



The above cut represents our so-called sign lamp. These are regularly 
fitted with the Edison candelabra base as shown, but ran also be fitted 
the Edison miniature base. Thej are selected for series burning. 

They are very largely used for sign and decorative work and being g 
all the care and attention which we give our regular lamps and submitted to 
the s.une refining processes, they are tar ahead, in quality, of the mar 
called, miniature lamps on the market 






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New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 

Eight Candle-power 220 Volt Lamp, 

( Edison Porcelain Insulated Base.) 




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Fig. 21— Full Size 

The above cut shows clearly the construction of our eight candle-power, 
high voltage lamps, made in voltages from JSO to 250- These lamps have" 
been put out only after a very exhaustive scries of experiments and tests and 
we unhesitatingly claim them to be superior to any other high voltage lamp 
"u the market. We have- followed the universal European practice and the 
tea* hing of our own tests, in using two coiled filaments in series, being cer- 
tain that we thus obtain a much better lamp than can be made by any 
Bj stem of multiple coils in a single filament. The necessity for an anchor is 
dispensed with Any standard base furnished. 



New York ft Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 

Sixteen Candle-power 220 Volt Lamp. 

( Edison Porcelain Insulated Base. ; 




Fig. 22 -Full Size. 
Tht abort col thou -two 

candle-power high v< 

candle powei high vol! I <• 

l.\ tli 

ciem j of these 
though 'hit 



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The Mogul Lamp 









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Three Hundred Cj«Jj prw> V At. Ilogyl 




New York & Ohio Company, Warren, Ohio 




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Fig. 24, No. I Socket. 



Fig. 25, No. 2 Socket. 




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Fig, 26, Porcelain and Tin Plain Shade* 



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Fig. 27, Convex Mogul Mirror Reflector. 




Fig. 2&, Concave Mogul Mirror Rxflector. 



DIPLOMA 









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